How to Create a Successful New Year Plan?

Do you have a plan laid out for the new year? Do you know your priorities and goals?

Even though it may change throughout the year, It’s important to give yourself a starting point to at least start the year on the right foot.

 

  • Define your Priorities

What is your focus for the new year? Take time to list out your priorities with pen and paper and rank them in order of importance. I like to go through and pick my top 3-5 priorities for this season. Remember, our seasons can change throughout the year. So we’re just establishing what’s most important to us right now.

  • Fill in Your Schedule

Look at a yearly calendar. What essential commitments have you already made? What important holidays, birthdays, and events do you need to plan around?

Once you have the major events penned in, you will have a better idea of what kinds of projects and goals for the year will be realistic.

This is where having planner you love really comes in handy. When you find a planner that works well for your life, using it is easier and you end up being more prepared and organized.

  • List Your Projects for the Year

This step is all about figuring out the “big” things you want to accomplish and then breaking those goals down into smaller steps. First, write down all your dreams for the year. Then, pick what is actually realistic.

  • Find your WHY and THEME

First of all, what’s the “Why” behind your goals? Why do you want to accomplish those goals you set? How are they going to impact your life? How will you feel when it’s done?

Next, it’s fun to set a theme for the year.

  • Establish Good Habits

I think that good habits are essential to achieving your goals.

For example, if your goal is to get up a half hour earlier every day, some habits that would support that goal might be prepping your clothes and breakfast the night before or making sure you go to bed on time.

  • Create a Schedule

I think this is important to mention when creating a plan because managing your time and schedule well will be key to actually achieving your goals.

So create a schedule and block out times where you will work on your goals.

  • Be Realistic

If your goals are too audacious, you may get frustrated with lack of progress and ignore them. On the other hand, if they’re too small, you’re more likely to procrastinate because you’ll have “Plenty of time to get them done.”

I think somewhere in the middle is the perfect place to be with your goals – just a bit more than you think you can do. Also remember that you can change your goals! They’re not set in stone. In six months you may be in a completely different place, and that’s ok!

A mid-year check on your goals, or even better, quarterly, is a good idea to make sure you’re on track and to see if there’s anything you need to change.

 

 

by Laura sue shaw

Ways to Becoming A successful Person

  1. Set concrete goals.

To become successful faster, you first need a road map for your career. After all, you can’t take shortcuts if there’s no end point in mind. The definition of success is different for everybody, so it’s important to get clear on your personal goals. What do you want to achieve in your career? Be as specific as you can, because it’s only when you’ve defined concrete goals. that you can create actionable steps toward them.

  1. Establish a routine, and stick to it.

Most successful people already know this: There’s a big benefit to repetition. Routines keep you moving forward and help you to keep growing. For one thing, if you follow a routine, it’s much easier to monitor your progress over time.

  1. Find a mentor.

Many highly successful people have this in common: They had a mentor. A mentor is someone who is on the same career path as you, but further along. From a place of experience, they can offer relevant information and guidance on your chosen career path.

  1. Streamline your routine.

What if I told you that you could simplify your life and remove roadblocks that are keeping you from becoming successful by doing less? Positive routines can help you advance in your career faster. But bad habits and time-wasting routines can have the opposite effect.

  1. Learn how to say no.

It can be hard to say no, but it is usually better in the long run. It shows integrity, and you won’t find yourself wasting time on things that aren’t advancing your career.

  1. Be smart about money.

It’s hard to get ahead when you’re constantly playing catch-up or living paycheck to paycheck. If you want to become successful faster, you need to get smart about saving money.

Do yourself a solid and put away some of every paycheck in your savings account.

  1. Learn from your mistakes.

If you want to become successful, you can’t let these missteps crush or break you down. Rather than seeing them as the end of the world, can you see them as an opportunity? Ultimately, failures can be our biggest teachers. After all, what feels like failure today could in fact be teaching you a lesson that will help you avoid a much bigger failure in the future.

International Women Scholarship 2021-2022 – Online Application

ISW institute scholarships for women are now open for the 2021-2022 session. There is No Application fee to apply for this women-only scholarship being offered to undergrad, master and doctoral program students.

First preference will be given to the women that prove prior dedication to the charitable or volunteering work for empowering women in their specific fields and also to the women through professional, community, or civic work.

Inspirational Speeches on women’s rights

Six ways to end gender-based violence

  1. Funding women’s full participation in civil society. Women who are active in civil society can be highly effective in influencing global, regional and national treaties, agreements and laws and in exerting pressure to ensure their implementation. More money needs to flow toward supporting women’s active participation in civil society.
  2. Scaling up prevention efforts that address unequal gender power relations as a root cause of gender-based violence. Some programs have effectively structured participatory activities that guide the examination of gender norms and their relationship to power inequities, violence and other harmful behaviors. They work with multiple stakeholders across the socio-ecological spectrum and across multiple sectors. But, we need to do a better job of evaluating these programs so we can move them from limited, small-scale pilots to larger-scale, societal-change programs.
  3. Bringing gender-based violence clinical services to lower-level health facilities. The provision of gender-based violence clinical services has focused on “one-stop shops” at high-level facilities, such as hospitals, where all services are offered in one place. But, the majority of people who access services at high-level facilities do so too late to receive key interventions, such as emergency contraception and HIV post-exposure prophylaxis. For faster access, we should focus on bringing services closer to the community, particularly in rural areas.
  4. Addressing the needs of child survivors, including interventions to disrupt the gender-based violence cycle. In shelters and services for women, it is common to see children of all ages in waiting rooms or safe houses. But, it is rare to see anyone working with these children, who have experienced a traumatic event. Sometimes they are victims, but most likely they are witnesses to violence against their mothers. We lack trained professionals to work with children who have experienced gender-based violence, especially when the perpetrators are parents or other family members.
  5. Developing guidance for building systems to eliminate gender-based violence. There is ample global guidance on how to address gender-based violence through certain sectors, such as health, or through discrete actions, such as providing standards for shelters or training for counselors. But, we are missing practical guidance for building the whole system from A to Z — putting laws into practice, raising awareness of services and creating budgets.
  6. Developing support programs for professionals experiencing secondhand trauma. After three years of working with a program to address school-related gender-based violence, I had to walk away. Despite my commitment to ending gender-based violence, I simply could not hear another awful story. My experience is not unique. Burnout is a reality, and we lack qualified people to deal with gender-based violence survivors.

Source degrees

Types of Sexual Violence

  • Sexual assault – a term including all sexual offenses. Any action or statement with a sexual nature and done without consent from both sides.
  • Rape – insertion of a bodily organ or an object into the sex organ of a woman without her consent.
  • Sodomy – insertion of a bodily organ or an object into a person’s anus or mouth without their consent.
  • Attempted rape – attempted insertion of a bodily organ or an object into the sex organ of a woman without her consent.
  • Gang rape – rape carried out by more than one attacker.
  • Serial rape – repeated incidents of rape carried out by the same attacker over an extended period of time.
  • Incest – Sexual abuse or assault at the hands of a family member.

What Sexual violence?

Sexual violence is any sexual act or attempt to obtain a sexual act by violence or coercion, acts to traffic a person or acts directed against a person’s sexuality, regardless of the relationship to the victim. It occurs in times of peace and armed conflict situations, is widespread and is considered to be one of the most traumatic, pervasive, and most common human rights violations.

Sexual violence is a serious public health problem and has a profound short or long-term impact on physical and mental health, such as an increased risk of sexual and reproductive health problems, an increased risk of suicide or HIV infection. Murder occurring either during a sexual assault or as a result of an honor killing in response to a sexual assault is also a factor of sexual violence. Though women and girls suffer disproportionately from these aspects, sexual violence can occur to anybody at any age; it is an act of violence that can be perpetrated by parents, caregivers, acquaintances and strangers, as well as intimate partners. It is rarely a crime of passion, and is rather an aggressive act that frequently aims to express power and dominance over the victim.

For more   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexual_violence

Source Wikipedia

What is Physical Abuse ?

Physical abuse is any physical force that injures you or puts your health in danger. Physical abuse can include shaking, burning, choking, hair-pulling, hitting, slapping, kicking, and any type of harm with a weapon like a knife or a gun. It can also include threats to hurt you, your children, your pets, or family members. Physical abuse can also include restraining you against your will, by tying you up or locking you in a space. Physical abuse in an intimate partner (romantic or sexual) relationship is also called domestic violence.